Albino Corn Snake May Close Zoo in Philipines

14 01 2008

Pasig City Mayor Robert Eusebio wants to close down the Arc Avilon Zoo in Ortigas Center if it is shown to have ignored guidelines to ensure the safety of visitors. He said he was taking action amid reports that a child was bitten by an Albino King Snake last Jan. 5. “If they fail to adopt safety measures for their patrons, we may have to have it closed,” he said. Eusebio wrote a letter to Avilon’s operator to explain how the facilities are secured to prevent a repeat of the incident. More…





Albino Deer Hit by Motorist In Arkansas

12 01 2008

This poor guy was the victim of a automobile collision (though the car owner may feel a bit of a victim also) on highway 365 near Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Albino Peacock

12 01 2008

It would be an interesting study to determine if there is an advantage (or disadvantage) to being albino in species such as peafowl and bettas that choose mates based on the impressiveness of a visual display.





Albino Snake Found in Trash

12 01 2008

A 10 inch baby albino corn snake was found hiding in rubbish at Winn Gardens, Middlewood.

The creature, which is native to the warmer parts of North America, lives on a diet of live mice and rodents, and can grow to 6ft long.

It is harmless to humans and is believed to have been an unwanted Christmas present which could have been thrown away.

More…





Partially Albino Elephant

11 01 2008

According to Dr Ian Whyte, elephant specialist at South Africa’s Kruger National Park, this young elephant is indeed partially albino, a condition that has been noted in a handful of young elephants in that park. “These have been young elephants (some very small babies) and it is not sure what becomes of them. It seems unlikely that they would grow darker with age as albinism is a permanent condition, but these young albino elephants seem to disappear. There have been at least two cases recently (of which I am aware) where such young albinos have been photographed. They have not been reported since. No one knows what becomes of them, though the mothers and families seem to treat them normally. Perhaps the albinistic condition does not protect them adequately from the sun which might result in some form of mortality related to over-exposure.”

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To Shoot or Not to Shoot Albino Deer – Minnesota vs. Wisconsin

11 01 2008

From Whitetail 365: What is little known about Buffalo Co. Wis. is that albino deer are fairly common there. In fact it’s entirely possible—after talking to the right people—to drive around some summer evening and see a pretty good wad of white deer feeding in soybean and alfalfa fields. While there’s no such thing as an ugly deer, albinos are a pretty darn special sight. The people of Wisconsin think they’re so special that you can get into big trouble for shooting one.

Of course, right across the Mississippi River from there is my home state of Minnesota. Kill a white deer here and you’ll get your picture in the paper, and not in the “district court report” section.  Protecting albinos is an interesting thing. Most of us know by now that these are genetically inferior deer that in most cases are poorly equipped to survive in the wild. Indeed, some of my Wisconsin friends have found albino bucks dying in the middle of summer from any of a host of diseases they’re susceptible to. Naturally, there are exceptions. About five years ago, I was hunting Buffalo and rattled in a 3-1/2 year old albino buck with an 8-point rack. That deer is still alive. He is now a monstrous 10-point with candelabra antlers that appear anything but genetically inferior.  People drive for miles to check him out, lining up along his favorite fields with spotting scopes sprouting from their truck windows. 

More…





Not Albino, but…Lobster Found with Rare Pigmentation

11 01 2008

A Nova Scotia fisherman made a rare catch this week when he hauled up a two-toned lobster in St. Mary’s Bay.

The lobster is divided into two colours straight down the middle of its back — dull green on one side and bright orange on the other.

The fisherman who owns the trap the female lobster was caught in has named it Jay after his son, who hauled it on board their boat on Jan. 8.

Jay the lobster has been donated to the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, N.S., as an educational exhibit.

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